News in Talent Management

The 9 Hottest Trends in Corporate Recruiting

The 9 Hottest Trends in Corporate Recruiting

The corporate recruiting market just gets hotter and hotter. We just returned from a two week tour through Europe and attended the iRecruit conference in Amsterdam, where we had the opportunity to talk with dozens of top recruiting managers. Here are the 9 hottest trends we see from our research, highlighting some of the newest startups in the space. 1. Corporate Talent Networks. With the growth of LinkedIn LNKD +1.39%, Twitter, Facebook FB -0.05%, Glassdoor, Indeed, and a variety of other tools available to promote your employment brand, companies have now evolved from a model of “candidate relationship management” to a model of building a “talent network” from which to recruit. The “talent network” is not just a place to post jobs, it’s a place to attract people: and it includes fans, candidates, employees, alumni, and even customers. These “talent networks” (AT&T T +0.37%, Microsoft MSFT +0.38%, IBM IBM -0.32%, many companies now have them) are viral product and service communities and they create magnetic attraction among prospective employees, customers, and partners. Vendors like Avature, BraveNewTalent, Jobs2Web, SelectMinds, and Smashfly help you build them. 2. Social Sourcing. Sourcing candidates over the web is critical to success today. The granddaddy of these solutions is LinkedIn, which sells the LinkedIn Recruiter tool to HR organizations. Most recruiters will tell you that having a LinkedIn recruiter license is the “cost of entry.” Many of the recruiters I talk with rely heavily on LinkedIn but no longer see it as a competitive advantage – because everyone else has it too. A whole barrage of exciting tools have been created to help companies better find and source key candidates. In the technology space interesting tools include Entelo, Gild, TalentBin, and RemarkableHire which are out there looking at all your social footprint to evaluate your technical prowess. These companies mine your personal code postings and other social information to create a profile and actual “competency ratings” based on your social data. 3. Recruiters as Sourcers not Recruiters. As companies globalize and look for more specialized skills, the role of the recruiter becomes more and more important. And where do we want recruiters spending their time? Interviewing people? Or sourcing great candidates? The highest-performing companies are now pushing more and more responsibility onto the shoulders of hiring managers (training them how to interview) and letting recruiters focus on high-powered sourcing and initial screening. The more “assessment” we push to hiring...

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What It Takes to Make New College Graduates Employable

What It Takes to Make New College Graduates Employable

MY older son graduated from high school last week and has started a pleasant job as a summer lifeguard. In four years we expect to attend his college graduation, and we hope the time there leaves him with great experiences, a love of learning and some idea how to get and keep a job. It’s that last part of the equation that I’m going to focus on. My heart sinks every time I read a news story or opinion piece quoting employers who charge that four-year colleges and universities are failing to provide graduates with the skills they need to become and remain employable. Of course, in many ways, this isn’t a new story. “A four-year liberal arts education doesn’t prepare kids for work and it never has,” said Alec R. Levenson a senior research scientist for the Center for Effective Organizations at the University of Southern California. Mara Swan, the executive vice president of global strategy and talent at Manpower Group, agreed. “There’s always been a gap between what colleges produce and what employers want,” she said. “But now it’s widening.” That’s because workplaces are more complex and globalized, profit margins are slimmer, companies are leaner and managers expect their workers to get up to speed much faster than in the past. “Employers are under pressure to do more with less,” Ms. Swan said. Unemployment rates for those with bachelor’s degrees or higher are still much better — at 3.8 percent in May — than those with only a high school diploma, which was 7.4 percent in May, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Nonetheless, a special report by The Chronicle of Higher Education and American Public Media’s Marketplace published in March found that about half of 704 employers who participated in the study said they had trouble finding recent college graduates qualified to fill positions at their company. But, surprisingly, it wasn’t necessarily specific technical skills that were lacking. “When it comes to the skills most needed by employers, job candidates are lacking most in written and oral communication skills, adaptability and managing multiple priorities, and making decisions and problem solving,” the report said. Jaime S. Fall, a vice president at the HR Policy Association, an organization of chief human resources managers from large employers, said these findings backed up what his organization was hearing over and over from employers. Young employees “are very good...

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America Inc.

America Inc.

John Higgins recalls a flight he took in 2009 from Los Angeles to Shanghai. Higgins, president and chief executive officer of Houston-based Neutex Advanced Energy Group Inc., was excited about his plans to bring his company’s manufacturing jobs back to the U.S. from China and shared the news with his seatmate, a Harvard MBA graduate. “The guy called me an idiot,” Higgins recalls with a laugh. “He said I was not acting in the best interest of the company.” The passenger wouldn’t be the last person to question Higgins’ decision to return production of his core product, LED lighting systems, to the U.S., a practice known as “reshoring.” At the time, the road leading U.S. manufacturers into China was one-way, with few executives making U-turns. “People thought we were crazy,” Higgins says. Yet Higgins got the last laugh. A few years later, “some of those same people who questioned our decision are calling to ask me how to reshore,” he explains. The Case for Reshoring The U.S. government doesn’t officially track reshoring of manufacturing operations—the number of jobs that left the United States and then returned. But Harry Moser, a 45-year manufacturing veteran who founded the Reshoring Initiative to encourage the trend, has recorded more than 300 cases since 2010, resulting in a net gain of about 50,000 U.S. jobs. Some high-profile examples include General Electric Co., Apple Inc., Google Inc., Caterpillar Inc. and Ford Motor Co.—all of which have reshored, or have announced plans to reshore, manufacturing jobs. The gains pale in comparison to nearly 6 million U.S. jobs that vanished from 2000 to 2010, when manufacturing employment shrank to 11.4 million from 17.3 million, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Still, economic and global trends are enough to cause some U.S. business leaders to think about reshoring. In January, the MIT Forum for Supply Chain Innovation released U.S. Reshoring: A Turning Point, which is based on a survey of executives at 340 companies. A third of the respondents were “considering” bringing manufacturing jobs back to the United States. One in six was “definitively” planning to reshore activities. And in the ongoing series of reports Made in America, Again, analysts from the Boston Consulting Group predict that the cost advantages to manufacture in China versus the United States will dissipate by 2015. In 2000, Chinese factory wages averaged 52 cents an hour, but annual double-digit percentage...

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