News in Talent Management

8 in 10 Employers Lack Recruitment Programs for Veterans

As the nation honors its veterans on Memorial Day, a new survey exposes the challenges veterans face in transitioning from military service to the civilian work world. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, there were more than 21 million U.S. veterans in 2014. Additionally, every year 240,000 to 360,000 soldiers leave military service. In 2014, the unemployment rate for veterans was 25 percent higher than the nonveteran rate. Service members often struggle to correlate military experience with civilian job descriptions and sometimes must deal with negative perceptions about their abilities and mental health. Yet despite all the national attention the topic receives, 80 percent of the 700 employers surveyed by Futurestep, a Korn Ferry company specializing in talent solutions, do not have veteran-specific recruiting initiatives. Further, 71 percent said their organizations do not provide training to hiring managers or recruiters on veteran hiring, and more than half (52 percent) do not provide onboarding or transition support to veteran hires. “Transitioning military members bring with them invaluable skills, experiences and traits, such as precise communication, individual accountability, impeccable execution and natural leadership,” said Bill Sebra, president, Futurestep North America. “Military recruiting is much more than corporate social responsibility … It’s a smart business decision that harnesses the amazing skills and talents of veterans to create successful outcomes for the company and the individual.” When asked what military skill set translates most directly to a management role, 47 percent of respondents chose leadership, followed by 20 percent who said team mentality and 13 percent who cited goal focus. Syracuse University’s Institute for Veterans and Families in 2012 published a list of skills and attributes that many veterans have. The skills included high need for achievement, high level of trust in leadership, comfort with autonomy, adeptness at skills transfer across tasks, advanced technical training, resiliency, team-building skills, organizational commitment, and comfort in dynamic and uncertain situations. “Central to the business case for hiring veterans is that these individuals make up a skilled workforce that has been found to be 4 percent more productive and 3 percent less likely to turn over than the overall civilian workforce,” said Robin Erickson, Ph.D., vice president of talent acquisition research for Bersin by Deloitte. Veterans have much more to offer companies than fulfilling diversity and inclusion initiatives, she said. What Employers Can Do Organizations that are committed to helping veterans find civilian jobs view supporting...

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The 36 Best Career and Technical Colleges for Vets in 2015

The 36 Best Career and Technical Colleges for Vets in 2015

Military jobs and training can provide service members with in-depth technical expertise — but how to convert that knowledge into success in the civilian world isn’t always obvious. “They have that technical experience, but they really don’t know where to plug that in,” said Gregory Scargall, veterans resource specialist at Santa Fe Community College. With the right education at a good technical school, though, “they’re able to re-harness some of that experience.” Scargall’s school, based in New Mexico, topped our 2015 Best for Vets: Career and Technical Colleges rankings. Fayetteville Technical Community College in North Carolina; Virginia College, headquartered in Alabama; The Los Angeles Film School in California and Thomas Nelson Community College in Virginia rounded out the top five. These rankings evaluated schools that responded to our detailed survey of more than 100 questions and indicated that they were career or technical institutions. We will publish a similar review of more traditional colleges and universities next month. Based on their responses to our survey, as well as Education Department data, the schools were evaluated on their culture, student support, academic policies, academic quality and financial considerations. On average, vets made up about 13 percent of the enrollments of schools responding to the survey. Responding schools appear to be on board with recent federal initiatives related to military education. Nearly nine in 10 told us they have signed on to the White House’s Principles of Excellence for military education. More than eight in 10 said they have signed on to both the first and second versions of the Memorandum of Understanding that the Defense Department has tied to its tuition assistance program. Better than six in 10 responding schools told us they have military or vet groups on campus. However, only 43 percent told us they have a veterans office, something that vet students have indicated is very important to them. More schools have begun to track how well their military and vet student populations are doing academically, but it’s still not a majority. Only about four in 10 schools were able to provide any military-specific academic outcome data. And while career and technical education programs often can be less costly than four-year degrees, survey responses indicated that vets still could end up digging in their pockets for tuition costs. Just half of schools have undergraduate tuition rates at or below the $250-per-credit-hour limit set for military tuition assistance....

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US Labor Department Proposes Critical Updates to Sex Discrimination Guidelines

US Labor Department Proposes Critical Updates to Sex Discrimination Guidelines

WASHINGTON — The U.S. Department of Labor today announced a proposal to clarify federal contractors’ requirements to prohibit sex discrimination. The recommended changes would revise the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs’ guidelines to align with laws, court decisions and societal changes since they were originally issued in 1970. “Our sex discrimination guidelines are woefully out of date and don’t reflect established law or the reality of modern workplaces,” said OFCCP Director Patricia A. Shiu. “We owe it to the working women of America — and their families — to fix this regulatory anachronism so there is no confusion about how federal contractors must comply with their equal opportunity obligations.” OFCCP’s sex discrimination guidelines implement Executive Order 11246, which prohibits companies with federal contracts and subcontracts from sex discrimination in employment. The proposed rule would update these guidelines to reflect demographic developments such as the increased presence of women in the workplace, as well as legal developments — including a Supreme Court ruling recognizing that a sexually hostile work environment is a form of sex discrimination and the Pregnancy Discrimination Act, which strengthened workplace protections for pregnant women. The agency’s notice of proposed rulemaking addresses a variety of barriers to equal opportunity that too many women face in the workplace today, including pay discrimination, sexual harassment, failure to provide workplace accommodations for pregnancy and gender identity and family caregiving discrimination. “A person’s gender should never determine whether or not she gets, keeps or advances in a job,” said Latifa Lyles, director of the department’s Women’s Bureau. “The rule we are proposing will protect workers from losing out on job opportunities because of antiquated stereotypes, nonconformity with gender norms or pregnancy.” The proposed rule will be published in the Federal Register on January 30, and the public will have until March 31 (60 days) to provide comments. More information, including the text of the NPRM, is available at www.dol.gov/ofccp/SDNPRM/. In addition to Executive Order 11246, OFCCP enforces Section 503 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Vietnam Era Veterans’ Readjustment Assistance Act of 1974. Collectively, these three laws require contractors and subcontractors that do business with the federal government to prohibit discrimination and ensure equal opportunity in employment on the basis of race, color, religion, national origin, sex, disability and status as a protected veteran. For more information, please call OFCCP’s toll-free helpline at 800-397-6251 or visit http://www.dol.gov/ofccp/. OFCCP...

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Talent management challenges and opportunities emerge for 2015

Talent management challenges and opportunities emerge for 2015

Futurestep has given some predictions for the talent management industry in 2015. Based on insights from 12 global experts, the list reflects trends that have emerged over the past 12 months that will likely dominate in the coming year. “As the economy strengthened in 2014, companies began allocating greater resources to manage their workforces,” says Byrne Mulrooney, CEO of Futurestep. “While rebuilding and expanding is on the corporate agenda, organisations are increasingly focused on quality of hires over quantity and using innovative solutions in HR technology to source smarter. This will continue to gain momentum in 2015 as companies hone their talent management processes to acquire specific types of candidates while consolidating recruitment processes to become more streamlined.” The trends that Futurestep believe will shape the global recruitment and talent management industry in 2015 are: 1. Mobile makes it easier – Tap and apply 2. Talent data capture enables C-suite decision making 3. Niche becomes the norm 4. Streamlining for success 5. Tailored tech takes off Mobile makes it easier – Tap and apply. The use of technology solutions has advanced rapidly in the recruitment space with mobile being a stand-out, as almost 50 percent of job seekers globally now search and apply for jobs using a mobile device*. Despite its popularity many organisations are still without a mobile-ready career site and as a result are missing out on reaching a spectrum of well-connected candidates with fast-paced lives. By putting mobile strategies first, whether sharing optimised content or facilitating video interviews on-the-go, businesses can not only extend their talent pool but also enhance their employer brand by creating a functional and enjoyable candidate experience. “In the advent of mobile technologies candidates want companies to ‘meet them where they live’ which is on their smartphones. Futurestep predicted that 2014 would be the year mobile recruitment finally took off and we have seen clear evidence of this. Now organisations must concentrate on honing their digital initiatives to engage passive, hard to reach candidates, whilst offering an excellent representation of employer brand and giving candidates a stand-out experience.” Neil Griffiths, Global Practice Leader, Talent Communications & Employer Brand Talent data capture enables C-suite decision making. As businesses increasingly use analytics to make informed decisions across the talent lifecycle, the tools they use to gather information continue to evolve. Processes from applicant tracking to career development analysis are becoming better incorporated into candidate...

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Trends in Talent Acquisition Technology

Trends in Talent Acquisition Technology

The recruiting industry is marked by constant change and innovation. While this is certainly a good thing — giving organizations new ways to connect and engage with top talent — keeping up with these changes can be overwhelming. But for companies to remain competitive, a firm understanding of the latest market trends and solutions available is integral to a successful talent acquisition process. So if your company is looking to refresh its recruiting strategy, it is important to consider these latest developments and how they can be applied to your organization to attract the right talent. So, how do we know what these trends are? By looking at the techniques in use or under development by the more than 60 companies designated as winners of the 2013 Candidate Experience Awards. The program found that there are three primary areas that these organizations were squarely focused on in 2013: Mobile services: With candidates no longer tethered to their desktop computers, organizations must provide a simplified, mobile-enabled application process to truly engage today’s job seekers. An effective strategy is more than just making the career site available on mobile devices; it should enable candidates to learn about the company and its positions as well as apply directly from their devices. Candidate relations management systems: The use of CRMs to manage interactions with candidates continues to rise, and most recruiters reported that they would rather spend more time in the CRM cultivating talent than working through the applicant tracking system. The CRM continues to become more of an interactive tool for working with future talent, as well as current, ready and available talent. Video interviewing systems: If you spend any time online, it’s clear that video truly is the next generation. Whether video interviewing, video job descriptions or realistic job previews or interactions, video should now be a core component for recruiting across the board. Each of these trends put the candidate center stage, providing new ways to interact with potential employees that connect with them where they are and how candidates search for jobs today. If your organization isn’t at least considering implementing these strategies, you run the risk of being behind your competition. It’s never too late to improve your recruiting practices, either with the options above or the ones that I believe are the biggest trends this year. These include: Credentialing and authentication: As candidates continue to demand and...

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US Secretary of State Announces Public-Private Veterans Partnership

US Secretary of State Announces Public-Private Veterans Partnership

10.31.2013 By Cheryl Pellerin – As Veterans Day approaches, Secretary of State John F. Kerry today announced a new public-private partnership intended to help veterans find international employment opportunities in the private and public sectors. “The Veterans Innovation Partnership, VIP as we are calling it, is not about just what the State Department can do for veterans, it’s really based on the notion that veterans can do a lot for the State Department and that we would be foolish not to try to reach out and harness the talent that exists,” Kerry told an audience at the State Department. Kerry, a Vietnam veteran, said he’s always believed that military experience helps validate ways in which those with such experience can project America’s force and values abroad. “Through the VIP we hope to bring together U.S. government agencies and private-sector leaders to seek out those who have served America and who are interested in international issues,” Kerry said. The program will provide veterans with fellowship opportunities at the State Department and other partners in the effort, including USAID, the Overseas Private Investment Corp., and the Millennium Challenge Corp. Through VIP, Kerry said, veterans get help finding international employment opportunities in the private and public sectors. “We need more people like Corneal Hunter, who served with the Army in Operation Desert Storm and in Kosovo and who now brings his understanding of budgeting and management as a budget analyst in the State Department’s Bureau of Diplomatic Service,” the secretary said. Kerry also mentioned Phil Schlatter, executive director of the Bureau of the Comptroller and Global Financial Services, whose 10-year career at the State Department was preceded by 22 years of military service that gave him experience at command levels and staff levels. And Joan St. Marie, whose Air Force experience in disaster preparedness, shelter operations and emergency management prepared her for her current role in the department’s Bureau of African Affairs. “I am absolutely convinced of the enormous talent and capacity that veterans can bring to this department to augment what we try to do on a global basis,” Kerry said, “and do so with a unique credibility, a unique ability to validate both the values and the interest that we are trying to represent.” The secretary expressed gratitude for partners who have signed up to work with the VIP program, including the University of Massachusetts in Boston and iRobot, a...

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Wounded Warrior Hiring Conference – Raleigh, NC October 16-17

Wounded Warrior Hiring Conference – Raleigh, NC October 16-17

“Hiring our Nation’s Heroes ~ Meet the Challenge. Hire a Veteran!”October 16-17, 2013 Hilton North Raleigh/Midtown, 3415 Wake Forest Road Raleigh, NC. The conference is sponsored by the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Manpower & Reserve Affairs, Department of the Navy and co-hosted by the U.S. Naval Sea Systems Command, U.S Naval Air Systems Command and the U.S. Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command. The conference is supported by DON’s Office of Civilian Human Resources, Navy Safe Harbor Program, Marine Corps Wounded Warrior Regiment and the Defense Civilian Personnel Advisory Service. Purpose: This conference brings together government, military and industry leaders that are committed to hiring and supporting Wounded Warriors in the workplace. These leaders and organizations can offer innovative strategies for successful reintegration, while remaining conscious that today’s fiscal environment makes this commitment increasingly challenging. This forum promotes career development and long-term employment, emphasizing the importance of education, training and monitoring. The theme of the conference is “Hiring Our Nation’s Heroes ~ Meet the Challenge – Hire a Veteran!”. Intended Audience: The audience will include senior federal, military and industry leaders of the public and private sector, along with their respective human resource professionals and hiring managers; Wounded Warriors and other veterans. Fees: THE CONFERENCE IS FREE, but registration is required. Parking is available at no charge on-site. Food and beverages will be available for purchase. Conference POC: For more information please contact the Conference Management Team at nssc_wwarriorhiring@navy.mil Article...

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The U.S. Skills Gap: Could It Threaten a Manufacturing Renaissance?

The U.S. Skills Gap: Could It Threaten a Manufacturing Renaissance?

08.28.2013 by Harold L. Sirkin, Michael Zinser, and Justin Rose These days, there are many reasons to be bullish about the future of U.S. manufacturing. As cost competitiveness in the U.S. continues to improve compared with, for example, China, Japan, and Western Europe, a growing number of companies big and small are considering repatriating the production of everything from machinery to electronics to U.S. shores. Some companies have already begun the shift. Others are planning to use the U.S. as a manufacturing platform from which to export to the rest of the world. The Boston Consulting Group has estimated that these trends could help create 2.5 million to 5 million U.S. jobs by the end of the decade. (See “Behind the American Export Surge,” BCG Focus, August 2013.) But even if economic factors are swinging in favor of the U.S., skepticism abounds over whether the manufacturing sector will really be able to absorb so much work. One concern is that the U.S. may no longer have enough skilled workers. Years of outsourcing and offshoring have so damaged U.S. manufacturing, the argument goes, that its once-abundant pool of welders, engineers, and machine operators have shifted to other occupations. And the U.S. education system is failing to train enough new skilled workers to replace those who retire. Is the U.S. really facing a manufacturing-skills crisis? We believe such fears are overblown—at least for the near term. Our research finds little evidence of a meaningful and persistent skills gap in most parts of the U.S., including in its most important manufacturing zones. The real problem is that companies have become too passive in recruiting and developing skilled workers at a time when the U.S. education system has moved away from a focus on manufacturing skills in order to put greater emphasis on other capabilities. Over the long term, therefore, serious skills shortages could develop unless action is taken. The following key findings are based on our analysis of job vacancy and wage data, as well as on a BCG survey of 100 companies with U.S. manufacturing operations. This is what we expect in the short term: • We estimate that the U.S. is currently short around 80,000 to 100,000 highly skilled manufacturing workers. But those numbers represent less than 1 percent of the nation’s total manufacturing workforce and less than 8 percent of its highly skilled workforce of approximately 1.4 million. •...

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Diane Pivirotto: Energy jobs key to the future

Diane Pivirotto: Energy jobs key to the future

Connecticut has a unique opportunity to rekindle its momentum toward job growth and economic leadership in the Northeast. In October, Gov. Dannel Malloy unveiled a new draft comprehensive energy strategy that promises to promote energy efficiency and facilitate access to clean-burning natural gas for 275,000 more Connecticut residents by 2020. The strategy suggests the initiatives are expected to create 10,000 jobs or more. This is a wonderful opportunity for Connecticut. But in order to fully capitalize on it, we must have a ready work force with the skills and education we’ll need to thrive as energy leaders. There is no better time to consider an energy career. Work force development is a concern in any industry, but it’s particularly pressing among energy companies. In the coming years, large percentages of experienced workers — including many here at UIL Holdings and its utilities — are expected to retire. The weak economy has caused many workers to temporarily postpone retirement and career changes, but that only adds to the mounting crunch we expect in the near future. How big is the challenge? The Center for Energy Workforce Development, a consortium of U.S. energy companies and associations, found in its 2011 survey that nearly 62 percent of employees in the energy industry have the potential to retire or leave for other reasons over the next decade. Moreover, our energy work force continues to age: The survey found that the average age of the energy work force has increased to 46.1, while the number of employees age 53 and above has increased by 5 percent. Meanwhile, demand for certain energy job categories remained strong. For example, the number of engineers employed in the industry rose 3.6 percent between 2009 and 2011, the survey found. The company where I work, UIL Holdings Corp., works to meet these challenges in partnership with organizations such as Connecticut Energy Workforce Development Consortium. We employ a variety of strategies, such as identifying specific shortage areas — engineers and project managers, for example — and developing best practices for attracting, training and retaining employees. UIL and its subsidiaries, The United Illuminating Co., The Southern Connecticut Gas Co., Connecticut Natural Gas Corp. and Berkshire Gas Co., also work with partners in academia, government and industry to provide opportunities for future energy workers. We offer internships, scholarships, mentoring programs and educational outreach efforts designed to attract and hold on to future...

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NAVSEA Partners with Charlotte Bridge Home for Vet Support

NAVSEA Partners with Charlotte Bridge Home for Vet Support

Charlotte, N.C. – The Naval Sea Systems Command signed a memorandum of understanding with the Charlotte Bridge Home in Charlotte, N.C., Oct.19, expanding the command’s relationship with a North Carolina-based non-profit that supports the transition of service-disabled veterans into the workforce.   This agreement marks the beginning of a partnership that will see both organizations sharing information and best practices to recruit, train and care for Wounded Warriors.   The memorandum also provides for shared employment and recruiting information for Wounded Warriors, as well as collaboration on education and training opportunities for Wounded Warriors, their families and their caregivers.   “These partnerships will provide more opportunities for more wounded warriors throughout America,” said Vice Adm. Kevin McCoy, commander NAVSEA. “We’re proud to work with organizations like Charlotte Bridge Home, and NAVSEA is in this collaboration 100 percent.”   After serving in the military, the transition to civilian life can be challenging as veterans recover from wounds, pursue further education and seek employment. The Charlotte Bridge Home serves as an entry point to connect returning veterans with resources and support services.   The facility was designated as a national pilot to create a more welcoming and livable environment for returning veterans and their families. The Charlotte Bridge Home serves veterans in the Charlotte, N.C., area during this transition by identifying their education, employment and healthcare needs and connecting them to the right community, state and federal resources.   In addition to this most recent agreement, NAVSEA has established several partnerships to increase veteran opportunities. Since the formation of NAVSEA’s Wounded Warrior program in October 2008, the command has pioneered Wounded Warrior employment and outreach programs and established the structure for public/private partnerships to provide education, training and job placement to hundreds of injured service members.   After four years of Wounded Warrior recruiting, NAVSEA has hired nearly 1,300 service-disabled veterans, with almost two thirds those hired since fiscal year 2011.   For more information about NAVSEA’s Wounded Warriors Program, please contact the NAVSEA Wounded Warrior Program Office at 202-781-1431.   – NAVSEA – (Article...

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